UV Air Purifiers

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  • #16538
    John Coers
    Participant

    I have a parish that was approached about installing UV air purifiers in the duct system to a church which they are interested in. I understand they work well in certain settings but I am questioning their effectiveness in a church building.

    #16539
    Ian Cull
    Participant

    There is almost no evidence of COVID-19 transmitting through ductwork, so this expensive install will probably have very little effect. UV lights are used in surgery suites mounted near the ceiling because they need to be as close to the source of virus as possible. I’m not suggesting in-room installations. For most church buildings, the best bet is making sure the ventilation system can provide sufficient air changes per hour– and open windows or bring in portable air cleaners when not.

    #16540
    Ken Hodes
    Participant

    I agree with Ian on what he said. A lot of buildings are going to an ionization program on the HVAC. It is supposed help disrupt viruses but also has the ability to coagulate dust particles and make the filters more efficient thus the building less dusty. I have a proposal that I am considering on that.

    #16541
    Paul Netter
    Participant

    Hello,

    UV systems have a legacy cost. I have installed GPS-IMOD(Global Plasma Solutions; (needle point bi-polar ionization) in our larger AHU’s. Easy install. Tied into our building energy management system on fan run command. Variable voltage input: 24vac, 115vac, 208/240vac. This was the only brand that i could find that did not give off quantifiable amounts of ozone.

    Equally important, as stated above, is air changes in the spaces.

    #16542
    Christopher Nye
    Participant

    We installed Nu-Calgon iWave ion generators at our office.
    *Self cleaning with a probable 15 year span.
    *After the first day they do not generate the ozone smell.
    *Sales literature says they significantly reduce dust, pollen viruses etc. While I haven’t done an actual test on air quality I can tell you they do bulk up particles and the air filters are showing much more material caught.

    Note our facility is 7 years old and we already had a in-depth cleaning program and HVAC maintenance so the change is noticeably tied to iWave installation.

    #16543
    Bryan JostworthBryan Jostworth
    Participant

    John,
    I don’t know of any brands to steer clear of. I can say that UV air purifier have some drawbacks. 1. being maintenance on them, they can be expensive to maintain as they have useable parts and bulbs that will go bad so it’s not a one and done deal. 2. would be they have to be installed correctly. Slapping them in the return duct isn’t the solution. 3. is to upgrade the filter MERV rating to 13 to help filter more particles. Along with installing them, it would be a good practice to clean the coils of any dirt and build up prior to an installation to make sure they are being effective. UV works best on mold, and other organisms. Some of them are rated to treat air for the COVID-19 virus but not all from what I’ve been reading. We have had more customers go with Ionization products as Ken mentioned. I will attach some information on that product for you. My file was too large. the system we have installed is called the UltraPure by iAIRE http://www.myiaire.com
    Hope that helps,

    Bryan Jostworth
    Executive Vice President
    Business Development

    tdgFacilities
    11400 Rockfield Ct
    Cincinnati, OH 45241
    mobile: 513.315.6467
    office: 513.834.6105
    Visit our TDG Website!

    Bryan Jostworth
    Executive Vice President
    Business Development

    tdgFacilities
    11400 Rockfield Ct
    Cincinnati, OH 45241
    mobile: 513.315.6467
    office: 513.834.6105
    Visit our TDG Website!

    #16545
    Jim Heirigs
    Participant

    Accurate comments already.
    You have to get the particles in front of the proper amount of UV light for the proper amount of time if you are trying to use this as Virus control. Almost impossible to do without a lot of maintenance. I would recommend a mechanical engineer (PE) design it not just a contractor if that’s the way you go. Lots of maintenance and maintenance costs.

    Last I looked, ASHRAE still has not recommended or confirmed bi-polar ionization testing but the literature sure seems positive. Cost is reasonable.

    FYI – All – Be sure your system/air handlers will handle high MERV filters before installing. Older systems were designed for about a Merv 8. Increase in pressure can cause problems. I run it by a Mech Engr friend before upgrading filters

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